You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘In the Workshop’ category.

Clinching in the Old Town's new ribsIt is a real pleasure to lead a behind-the-scenes tour amongst our impressive collection of canoes, kayaks and other bits and pieces. Sometimes, as we are wrapping things up and turn to look back across a warehouse of over 500 boats from around the world, I’ve been asked the unexpected question, “how long will it take to restore them all?Collections storage

Now I’m not intending to know how often this question might be put to other museums at a similar moment but I suspect it is rather less common. The inference here might that many of our old boats look a little rough. Indeed, most do lack the shiny, over-glossed appeal of a restored classic boat and perhaps there is something about an old wooden canoe with alligatored varnish, missing some of its paint, canvas or planking that screams for our attention. Maybe it just looks like another chore needed doing at the cottage, but ramped up several hundred times. Read the rest of this entry »

Summer is drawing to a close and that can mean only one thing…Back to School! Whether you are a parent, student or teacher this time of year probably has special significance for you.

Here at the Museum back to school means that our exciting hands-on school programs are back up and running full force. There’s nothing we like better than a museum full of kids exploring and making lots of noise in our galleries. If you have never taken part in one of our school programs before you can check out our wide array of offerings here.  For those of you who have taken part in our school programs in the past you will be excited to learn that we have officially added two new programs to our roster this year: Full Size Paddle Carving for youth ages 15-18, and Canoes Count, a fun and interactive program for JK/SK classes.

June Paddle Carving

June Paddle Carving

Read the rest of this entry »

Hi everyone! For those that aren’t familiar with me, my name is Kate Lawler and I have been volunteering around the Museum for the last month and a half. I’ve been tucked away in the Dembroski Exhibit Studio, scanning and doing data entry, so it’s not a surprise if you haven’t seen me before!

The Canadian Canoe Museum is one of the historic gems in the heart of Peterborough. Many tourists visit the Museum every summer, and many memories are made here. I myself remember when my Girl guide troop stayed the night here. The Museum is a fun destination for kids and adults, with activities such as puppet shows, soapstone carving, and even learning to bake bannock.  Not to mention the beautiful canoes on display. Read the rest of this entry »

Do your canoe seats look like this?

SANYO DIGITAL CAMERA Read the rest of this entry »

Summer – something many of us in Canada look forward to all year long and I’m no exception.JS NCD 2012 03 - 650 pixels I always love that first warm and sunny day of the season when people instantly seem to be in a better mood because of the nicer weather. For many of us, summer means vacations or weekend getaways.

packed-carPacking up the car or truck – trying to find the right combination of ‘Tetris’ pieces so that everything actually does fit into the vehicle (or on top). Hitting the road for camping or cottage weekend adventures, or to experience a never visited or much loved attraction or summer festival. I’ve noticed that during the summer months, it’s hard to drive on a highway without seeing a vehicle with a canoe or kayak strapped on top (sometimes both) or find a lake without a seeing a canoe or kayak gliding through the water. Read the rest of this entry »

Something had to be done.

For a long while, we’ve been offering this kind of paddle-carving program:

DSC02324 2012 Feb 15 St.Catherine PC boy

And this kind of paddle-carving program:

adult PC workshop

The first picture is from an awesome, satisfying and skill-developing program for kids aged 10 and up, in which the students take a 24-inch softwood (poplar) prepped blank to a completed mini-paddle in 3 hours.  We’ve shared this hands-on education program with thousands of grade 4+ students, Scouts, Guides and our summer paddling camp participants; we also offer a paddle-carving birthday party option.

The second photo is from one of our acclaimed weekend-long artisan-led paddle-carving workshops for adults. No softwoods in this program; this is the real deal.  Taking that hardwood cherry blank – which is only minimally prepped – to a finished paddle takes two full days of focused woodworking with specialized tools, facilitated with a 1:5 instructor to participant ratio.  And what a gorgeous paddle you end up with – a paddle that will be treasured and used for a lifetime. Read the rest of this entry »

This blog post was inspired by this funny little image that our General Manager, John Summers, emailed to me the other day.   I’ve often stumbled upon the same image while lurking around on the internet, usually while doing strange combination-searches for things canoe-related and things knitting-related.  Here it is:

Barbie

This crafty pattern made me think.  A ‘Crocheted Barbie Canoe’ might not be very practical – but, there’s definitely something fun about it.  So what happens when you combine canoeing stuff and DIY stuff?  Well, keep reading and you’ll see some unique examples!  (by the way, you might still have time to purchase the Crochet Canoe pattern on Ebay!) Read the rest of this entry »

I have to confess that when I started working here at The Canadian Canoe Museum I didn’t know what a wanigan was.  For the small percentage of hard-core canoe trippers (and the large percentage of everyone else!) who don’t know what a wanigan is – it’s a wooden box, carried with a tumpline, and usually used to store kitchen supplies while on a canoe trip.

Wanigan

A wanigan and tumpline sitting in a canoe in the Museum’s ‘A Walk With Kirk’ Gallery

When I had the opportunity to make one for myself, as part of the preparation for a program we were doing here at the Museum, I jumped at the chance.  I went on a trip not long after I finished my wanigan and I have to say that I loved it.  I also have to say that it did take a bit of getting used to.  At first I hadn’t tied the tump correctly for my height and it was resting lower on my back than it should have been, which meant it was bouncing a bit which was very uncomfortable.  Once I adjusted the tumpline it was perfect, and I truly felt like a super-hero carrying much more weight that I ever could have comfortably done with a backpack. Read the rest of this entry »

One of our most popular Artisan Workshops is our ‘Woodland Pack Basket Workshop.’  Doesn’t this look neat:

IMG_1830 Read the rest of this entry »

The positioning of the chine stringers is a critical element in building a Greenland skin on frame kayak. The placement of the chine stringers will affect the speed, tracking and stability of the boat. The chine stringers run the length of the kayak from bow to stern and are selectively placed between the keel stringer and gunwales. It is important to consider certain important factors when attempting to determine the appropriate placement of the chine stringers. First, the chine stringers must be placed in a way to ensure that the skin of the kayak is elevated enough by the stringers themselves to prevent the skin from resting on the ribs.

Using cord to see if the stringers are placed in way that will prevent the skin from touching the ribs

Read the rest of this entry »