You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘Friends of the Museum’ category.

Clinching in the Old Town's new ribsIt is a real pleasure to lead a behind-the-scenes tour amongst our impressive collection of canoes, kayaks and other bits and pieces. Sometimes, as we are wrapping things up and turn to look back across a warehouse of over 500 boats from around the world, I’ve been asked the unexpected question, “how long will it take to restore them all?Collections storage

Now I’m not intending to know how often this question might be put to other museums at a similar moment but I suspect it is rather less common. The inference here might that many of our old boats look a little rough. Indeed, most do lack the shiny, over-glossed appeal of a restored classic boat and perhaps there is something about an old wooden canoe with alligatored varnish, missing some of its paint, canvas or planking that screams for our attention. Maybe it just looks like another chore needed doing at the cottage, but ramped up several hundred times. Read the rest of this entry »

What has felt like a short summer is quickly approaching its end and so is the duration of time that the summer students have spent here at The Canadian Canoe Museum.  Three other lucky ladies and I have had the opportunity to work at and within the Canoe Museum community this summer. From everyday tasks to specialized projects I must say that our time here was well spent and by far a blast!

A typical day for us at the Museum would start by checking in, turning on all the televisions which play short films, opening the gift store and tidying up any little things out of place if needed. From there on who knew what the day would through at us. Some days it would consist of helping out the education faculty. Helping set up for programs such as soap stone or paddle carving or gathering camp equipment for the summer campers.  We could be rearranging an entire room to accommodate 50 students, or 12, or be making crafts for education programs to come. Read the rest of this entry »

Summer is drawing to a close and that can mean only one thing…Back to School! Whether you are a parent, student or teacher this time of year probably has special significance for you.

Here at the Museum back to school means that our exciting hands-on school programs are back up and running full force. There’s nothing we like better than a museum full of kids exploring and making lots of noise in our galleries. If you have never taken part in one of our school programs before you can check out our wide array of offerings here.  For those of you who have taken part in our school programs in the past you will be excited to learn that we have officially added two new programs to our roster this year: Full Size Paddle Carving for youth ages 15-18, and Canoes Count, a fun and interactive program for JK/SK classes.

June Paddle Carving

June Paddle Carving

Read the rest of this entry »

Now that we’ve got your attention and maybe have you wondering if we’re about to post a Canoe Museum Spring Break video, I’d like to tell you about a very interesting trip that some of us just went on. You’ve probably heard that the Museum is in the middle of a feasibility study?  A group of consultants, fundraisers and architects is helping us to explore what it would mean for the Museum to move to a new home on the waterfront somewhere in Peterborough. If you’ve visited the Museum in person, you’ll know that the water is a little hard to reach from our present site. You might also know that a number of years ago we tried to bring the water to the Museum. Turns out it’s easier to bring the Museum to the water.

An important part of a study like this is learning more about what other institutions are up to. Sometimes, you get some really good ideas to take back to your own shop. Other times, you realize that what you’re doing is actually pretty good. Either way, it’s well worth the effort. We began our road trip at The Antique Boat Museum in Clayton, NY. Located on a waterfront campus on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, the ABM is known far and wide for its collection of more that 300 pleasure boats, ranging in size from 6′ long to over 100′ long.

ABM site guide page 1 Read the rest of this entry »

Hi everyone! For those that aren’t familiar with me, my name is Kate Lawler and I have been volunteering around the Museum for the last month and a half. I’ve been tucked away in the Dembroski Exhibit Studio, scanning and doing data entry, so it’s not a surprise if you haven’t seen me before!

The Canadian Canoe Museum is one of the historic gems in the heart of Peterborough. Many tourists visit the Museum every summer, and many memories are made here. I myself remember when my Girl guide troop stayed the night here. The Museum is a fun destination for kids and adults, with activities such as puppet shows, soapstone carving, and even learning to bake bannock.  Not to mention the beautiful canoes on display. Read the rest of this entry »

So you’ve never been to The Canadian Canoe Museum. You’re missing out. It’s awesome! Want proof?

Front Entrance-Don Rankin

While I admit I’m a little biased because I work here, here’s what some other Museum visitors and cool peeps had to say about the Museum in person in our guestbook and online via our Twitter, Facebook, and TripAdvisor pages. Some even go so far as to suggest moving in… Read the rest of this entry »

You may or may not know that Peterborough’s Fleming College offers two post-graduate diplomas in Museum related fields. One in Museum Management and Curatorship, and the other in Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management. Every year Fleming releases a new cohort of students into museums across the country and a few (including myself!) have been lucky enough to land here at the Canoe Museum. In fact, it was through my internship with the Fleming Museum Management and Curatorship program that I eventually ended up being hired on here at the Museum.

That's me during my internship at the Museum last summer.

That’s me cleaning away during my internship at the Museum last summer.

We are very lucky to have access to this pool of highly interested and engaged volunteers. Each year we end up with a handful of awesome and dedicated Museum studies volunteers who want to explore different areas of Museum life. Read the rest of this entry »

Members of the Gordon family have been building canoes in and around Lakefield, ON since the mid 1800s.  Thomas Gordon started the Thomas Gordon Canoe Co. in the 1850s and he began a family tradition that continues to this day.

When we had two Gordon watercraft, one canoe and one skiff, donated to our collection a couple years ago by John Gordon (great grandson of Thomas Gordon) we knew it wouldn’t be long before we would put them on exhibit.

smaller hooke 8 5 x 7 85 filter

Thomas Gordon (foreground) working on a canoe.
Photo courtesy of Kathy Hooke.

Read the rest of this entry »

We have spent enough time blogging that we are starting to feel familiar with the various people and voices floating around out there in the blogosphere. The wonderful thing about the internet is being able to connect with so many paddling and outdoors enthusiasts from around the world (and some in our own backyard). We’re always learning something new.

So without further ado….drumroll please….we present:


The Canoe Museum’s Top Ten Must-Read Blogs of 2013
(…so far, and in no particular order)

1. Exploring Ontario by Canoe

exploring ontario by canoe

For those of you interested in paddling in Ontario this blog is a must-visit! Packed with a cornucopia of tips, tricks, advice, recipes, fun facts, trip planning resources and gear recommendations this blog is a great resource for people interested in exploring Ontario’s abundant waterways and parks.   Check out this latest entry: Top 10 Tips I Forget Not Everyone Knows for some helpful hints that might make your next adventure run a little more smoothly.

2. Paddle Making (and other canoe stuff)

murat hardar

Read the rest of this entry »

We are quite pleased when we have the opportunity to share our passion for canoeing history.  This passion can take the form of outreach programs, conferences, tradeshows and increasingly often, travelling exhibits.  Forming partnerships with other museums is very gratifying and an important part of what we do as a cultural institution.

Our most recent travelling exhibit is currently installed at Grace and Speed  in Gravenhurst Ontario.  The exhibit, featuring racing canoes, explores the evolution of racing shells and the athletes who propelled them to victory. The boats featured in this exhibit also serve as a little teaser for what is to come.

grace and speed Read the rest of this entry »